We Fight to Eradicate Human Trafficking & Sexual Exploitation

Be an abolitionist and join us as we shine a light on the darkness of sex trafficking and modern-day slavery.

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FREEDOM WALK – Saturday, October 2

Join the hundreds of abolitionists that will walk for the thousands of human trafficking victims in our community.

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Over 45 THOUSAND cases of human trafficking have been reported in the United States alone. Over 40.3 MILLION cases worldwide. We’re on a mission to change that.

Learn more about the problem and our solution to prevent and put an end to human trafficking and sexual exploitation in our lifetime.

Give the gift of FREEDOM

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Donate to stop human trafficking. Make a difference and change lives with your one-time gift.

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Become a Monthly Freedom Partner. Donate to stop human trafficking with a recurring gift.

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Fundraise

Need human trafficking fundraiser ideas? Raise money for the work of Hope Inspire Love. Start a fundraising team page today!

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Together we can be a voice for the voiceless

Hope Inspire Love fights sex trafficking and sexual exploitation in three strategic ways.

Outreach & Awareness

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Outreach & Awareness

We strive to shift the culture by amplifying the voice of the voiceless with powerful messages through video, trainings, digital media, and the written word.

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Prevention

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Prevention

We are a human trafficking organization in PA that educates and creates resources that equip people with information to prevent sex trafficking and modern-day slavery from ever happening in the first place.

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partnerships

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Partnerships

We partner with intervention-effort operations to help rescue survivors and direct them to safe environments and restoration aftercare programs.

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Fight for their freedom

None of us can do everything, but each one of us can do
something—something extraordinary. When we all come
together in the fight against this perverse act, there is a
local and global impact. Freedom!

Together, we can break the cycle of sexual exploitation.

Be a world-changer today

Together, we are a force for good. Together, we are being kingdom-minded & purpose-driven.

Transforming Lives & Restoring Hope STARTS WITH YOU!

Donate & Sponsor Freedom

You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know.

WILLIAM WILBERFORCE

Trafficking Myths

Myth

Victims will escape or ask for help if they need it.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Victims of trafficking are often psychologically and physically abused. Fear of retaliation, due to threats and physical violence, deter victims from seeking help. Additionally, some victims are ashamed of what they have experienced. They do not always self-identify and may not realize that they have rights.

Myth

Trafficking only occurs in foreign countries.

Learn the Truth
Reality

A common misconception is that trafficking happens only in developing countries. The UN reports that “Every country in the world is affected by human trafficking, whether as a country of origin, transit or destination for victims.”

Myth

Trafficking does not impact me.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Trafficking is one of the fastest growing criminal practices in the world. Many organizations across various industries make and distribute products produced by human trafficking victims. These products are sold worldwide, unbeknownst to consumers. Because trafficking is so widespread, it affects all communities around the world in some way.

Myth

Trafficking is prostitution.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Not every person who is exploited through forced labor has been trafficked, and not all people working in prostitution are forced or trafficked, however there is a strong link between the two.

Myth

Only females can be victims and survivors of sex trafficking.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Anyone can experience sex trafficking, including men. Traffickers prey on the vulnerable, often with promises of a better life. The UNODC estimates that women and girls account for about 80% of the detected human trafficking victims, which means that around 20% of victims are males. LGBTQ boys and young men are seen as particularly vulnerable to trafficking.

Myth

Victims must be held against their will using some form of physical restraint or bondage.

Learn the Truth
Reality

While some traffickers physically hold the people they exploit, it is more common for them to use psychological means of control. Fear, trauma, drug addiction, threats against families, and a lack of options due to poverty and homelessness can all prevent someone from leaving. Some individuals who experience trafficking may also be manipulated or believe they are in love with their trafficker, which can make them resistant to seeking help.

Myth

Human trafficking is the same thing as sex trafficking.

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Reality

Sex trafficking is a form of human trafficking. Human trafficking also includes labor trafficking, which involves children and adults compelled to perform labor or services by force, fraud, or coercion. Victims are found in legitimate and illegitimate labor industries, including sweatshops, massage parlors, agriculture, restaurants, hotels, and domestic service.

Myth

Traffickers target victims they don’t know.

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Reality

Many survivors have been trafficked by romantic partners, including spouses, and by family members, including parents.

Myth

People being trafficked are physically unable to leave their situations/locked in/held against their will.

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Reality

That is sometimes the case. More often, however, people in trafficking situations stay for reasons that are more complicated. Some lack the basic necessities to physically get out – such as transportation or a safe place to live. Some are afraid for their safety. Some have been so effectively manipulated that they do not identify at that point as being under the control of another person.

Myth

All commercial sex is human trafficking.

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Reality

All commercial sex involving a minor is legally considered human trafficking. Commercial sex involving an adult is human trafficking if the person providing commercial sex is doing so against his or her will as a result of force, fraud or coercion.

Myth

People in active trafficking situations always want help getting out.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Every trafficking situation is unique and self-identification as a trafficking victim or survivor happens along a continuum. Victims may be afraid to come forward and get help. Fear of retribution from traffickers, isolation, threats of violence, danger to their families, guilt, shame, misplaced loyalty and expert manipulation are among the many factors that may keep a person from seeking help or identifying as a victim even if they are, in fact, being actively trafficked.

Myth

Human trafficking does not occur in the United States. It only happens in other countries.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Human trafficking exists in every country, including the United States. It exists nationwide—in cities, suburbs, and rural towns—and possibly in your own community.

Myth

Individuals must be forced or coerced into commercial sex acts to be victims of human trafficking.

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Reality

Under U.S. federal law, any minor under the age of 18 who is induced to perform commercial sex acts is a victim of human trafficking, regardless of whether he or she is forced or coerced.

Myth

Traffickers kidnap their victims.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Most human traffickers play psychological games to trick, defraud, manipulate or threaten victims into providing exploitative labor or commercial sex. While physical coercion or kidnapping can play a role, most often victims are tricked through lies and promises of a better life.

Myth

Children and teens sometimes choose to enter into commercial sex work.

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Reality

Just as a minor is legally unable to enter into a contract to open a bank account or buy a car, a minor cannot consent to any form of participation in the commercial sex industry.

Myth

We should be most concerned about human trafficking during major sporting events.

Learn the Truth
Reality

During major sporting events, like the Olympics and Super Bowl, there’s an uptick in law enforcement surveillance and mass social attention around human trafficking. Many argue hyper-masculine sporting environments breed more demand for sex-trafficked women and girls. But, most of the time, women and girls aren’t trafficked specifically for these events. Often, they’ve been in forced sex work long before massive crowds come to the area. Sex trafficking isn’t isolated to one time of year or one location.

Myth

All sex traffickers are gang or mafia member pimps.

Learn the Truth
Reality

Pimping has become so normalized and even glamorized in the media that many young men and boys, especially gang members, want to become pimps. Pimps consider it easier to sell a person for sex than to sell drugs or guns. Drugs and guns can be sold only once. A person, however, can be sold for sex over and over. Anyone can be a trafficker, including family members, friends, and neighbors. This crime is not exclusive to known pimps and gang members.

Myth

Abuse is always face-to-face.

Learn the Truth
Reality

A new and devastating form of trafficking is becoming increasingly dangerous: cybersex trafficking. Pedophiles and predators can sexually abuse boys and girls right from their computers. This dark crime sees Western abusers livestream the sexual abuse of children over the internet. Online predators pay to direct the abuse from faraway countries such as the US, UK, Netherlands, and Australia. Cybersex trafficking is easy to hide and shrouded in anonymity. Victims can be exploited in any location with the internet and a webcam, or even just a mobile phone.

Myth

Pimps are always men.

Learn the Truth
Reality

In fact, 37% of people convicted for trafficking crimes are women. Female pimps use violence and threats, as much as male pimps, to keep women trapped in some of the darkest corners of red light districts. In cybersex trafficking cases, it is often the mothers and fathers of children who are the ones abusing them on camera.